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  • Hand held ecaller

    All of this ecaller talk has me thinking about buying another caller just for use at the blind. Something compact with a remote and just one speaker, that we could scream at the far flocks or flocks leaving as well as direct it at working flocks and maybe even throw a rossi track on if we see some of those. Some of the FoxPro ones seem to be what I am looking for, but they seem to be more predator hunting driven with the speaker on the front and back of the unit. What do you guys use?

  • #2
    Well, unfortunately if you want loud and good quality for that caller, compact/cheap/etc. don't really fit well. To blast out there you need a powerful amp, and for it to be decent audio quality you need a quality amp. Think $100 or so minimum for the amp as a good premise. The cheap and mini-amps just don't meet their stated output, and quality goes downhill quickly at high volume. Although at distance I don't think quality is as big an issue, you don't want it to be a static mess either. If you're using it from your phone that is enough of a remote in my opinion. You just leave the call powered on and turn volume up or down from phone, or hit pause and switch tracks.

    I have one 50W horn speaker on an amp that puts out 50W RMS per channel on this call, and shut it off as birds approach. I've thought about getting a 100W horn for this. The track I use to blast out there is Sweet Talk'n Snows - Euphoric Rush. It sounds like a big flock that is flying or just lifted up, non-stop clean barks and almost zero low frequency murmurs. It will rattle your brain when holding a horn in your hand! It sounds the best and sends out the most "hey look over here" shock value of the tracks I have when I've listened to them from a distance. I don't think feeding tracks or those with a lot of background noise sound as good to blast, you hear high pitched barks best at distance not feed murmurs. Juvy juke box Social Finishers sounds pretty good too when cranked up, the barks are very sharp and travel well, I may try that this year as well.

    You may not want to spend the most money on a call you only use once in a while, so what you could do is get a quality amp and put 4 horn speakers around the blind facing all directions, then you don't have to hold and point it. Or maybe have three horns, one in your hand and two outside a bit and crank it and turn it down as they approach.
    Last edited by jolle; 01-20-2021, 05:38 PM.

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    • #3
      I used a fox pro for about 15 years with good results. I had the original snow/crow with just a single speaker. It was loud enough to hurt your ears when you had it in hand, and being able to point it in the direction you wanted was a big plus, at least in my mind. It was very small, and easy to handle, which was another big selling point. I hunted with this single speaker long enough to know that the current 4-8 speaker systems are not doing you guys any favors.

      To your question about pointing a speaker at a flock and having them turn, I can tell you I did this many times with my hand held unit. When birds are several miles out, quality of the sound is a lot less important than when they are at a few feet.

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      • #4
        Thats what I was thinking, I have a 4 speaker SSCP in the spread already but would love the flexibility of being able to just crank one speaker. Going to need another unit for that.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Kansasgoose View Post
          I hunted with this single speaker long enough to know that the current 4-8 speaker systems are not doing you guys any favors.
          What do you mean, that one is sufficient and more are not worth the hassle? Or that more are a detriment to working birds?

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          • Kansasgoose
            Kansasgoose commented
            Editing a comment
            Yes, I think one is sufficient. I hunted with just one speaker a lot, and then switched to a 2 speaker system. Very simple, less hassle and less to worry about. I have also hunted with a remote controlled single speaker, it also did just fine and reinforced my opinion that birds will go to the speakers.

            which is the other point. Yes, 8 speakers is a detriment to working birds, IMO. MANY, MANY people, maybe all of you, will disagree, but I believe the birds tend to focus on the sound. If your sound is spread out, they will focus on the many spots. I think this increases their circling drive. And if you have speakers 100 yards away from your gun, is that really where you want them to land??? As with duck hunting, you can call and sometimes get a bird or two to really react, and then a good caller calls to that bird. This same tactic seems to work with snows, at least some of the time. Rather than pulling that bird in 8 directions, just pull it to the one, right where you want it to be.

            I will also say, not everyone hunts snows the same. I believe in getting birds in close and having tight shots, like 30 yards and closer. I also like to shoot birds in front of me. If you hunt snows and want 50 yard, overhead shots, then my tactics are not going to work well for you. I also don't use rotaries or other motion near my speakers, so that may also change how they react.

            To those who will say its more natural to have sound over the entire spread, I will say I don't want them to be interested in my entire spread, just where I am in the spread.

        • #6
          We are going to run a four speaker system with power horns and have them pointed in the direction our flight birds come from and have a loud big flock track on it for when they are at a distance and until they start to pitch. Once they start to work we are planning on shutting that one completely off and working them with a JJB with outdoor speakers and a different track playing on it. That's our plan.

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          • #7
            I was thinking something along the lines of a Foxpro Inferno or similar?

            https://www.gofoxpro.com/products/di...-calls/inferno

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            • #8
              Originally posted by jolle View Post

              What do you mean, that one is sufficient and more are not worth the hassle? Or that more are a detriment to working birds?
              We use a 4 speaker system right where we want them to land. Pretty much keep all 4 speakers back to back just facing different directions.

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              • Kansasgoose
                Kansasgoose commented
                Editing a comment
                Lots of ways to kill geese. what ever works for you, keep doing it.

            • #9
              Kansasgoose, thanks for the input. I like the simplicity as the more systems we've added, the more thought has to go into "well where do I put this one and which way do I point it's speakers". I'm not sure I hunt enough days per year, and good days at that, to say I feel I can see how one approach vs. the other affects birds working. Or one track vs. another track. Guys who promote full spread coverage with noise talk about elimination of dead spots. I don't believe there are any dead spots, just volume differences. Walk behind a horn speaker and you still hear it fine, just not the same volume. Outdoor speakers spread their noise more evenly. Do birds get suspicious with volume differences? Probably not, unless it's on the too loud side which can spook them.

              Anyway, yeah we have done well enough with single systems near the hunters that I feel that's sufficient, and when birds aren't finishing I'm betting hide or other factors are a bigger contributor than sound only coming from one spot. Thanks again.

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              • #10
                I started out with the Johnny Stewert 1 speaker cassette tape that only had about a 30 foot cord. The geese always came right to it. Over the years the birds have evolved and adapted to many things. We as hunters tend to try and make sense of or rationalize what these evolution's are. Its the sound, the decoys, the tracks in the field ect. Over the years I have hunted these birds, both fall and spring I have done my best to make sense of all that goes on with these birds. Having digested as much knowledge as I can from this forum and others a few trends keep popping up. At least in my mind.

                1.) Must be well, I mean completely hidden from the eyes of the flock. Adults seem very good at picking out an abnormality in the field. From the birds eye view humps, clumps and bumps that do not seem natural can spell danger. You must go to extremes to eliminate that. Hunters in white need to be "blended" in to the spread. Some of the drone footage I have seen is very telling to this point and the blind situation.

                2.) Calling, the birds will focus on the sound. My experience and observations over the years have taught me that, in the fall if there is only one person calling in a spread of 1000 decoys most of the time the birds will come to the caller. So if the caller is on one end or the other the birds may favor one side over the other(wind will have some influence on this) so I do most of the calling in our group and I most of the time take the middle position on lighter wind days and the upwind side on big wind days to put birds where everyone can shoot. In the spring I like the caller about 10 yards in front with a speaker pointing straight up and one straight away. centered on light to moderate wind and slightly upwind on big wind days. The sound is where they want to be because that's where the food is and the the reaction is not one of come hear and enjoy it with us it's - STAY AWAY it's mine and I'm not sharing. Funny, its the same way with mating... That location should look the best too because all the focus will be on that location. All birds will come to sound and decoys in the right spot helps but sound is what they trigger on.

                Well that's my .02 worth. If you have the location they want to be in then points 1 and 2 are the next most important. All the rest is important but can have more wiggle room.

                Qac

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                • #11
                  Kansasgoose,

                  exactly what I think too. The argument that comes from either view is we,as hunters, never know what each specific flock will respond to better cause we can’t change it to find out. Did that flock flare or work wrong cause there’s 4 ecaller going thru out the spread? Did the next flock flare cause we ran 1 caller? Who knows. I will say this, in all the years I’ve chased these dumb birds, they work to the sound and 99.9% of the time to the upwind side of your spread. To each their own, it’s not my money or time wasted to run multiple ecallers.

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