Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

flyers or not

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • flyers or not

    Drove around a new area I am hunting this year and saw 7 spreads around the reservoir the birds use as a roost, Every spread seems to have the same small number of flyers "3-6" except for one really impressive big full body spread with NONE. I am hunting away from the masses and the closest spread is 7 Miles away and on a different flight line. If I have wind I have ran them since I started playing the game but with a bigger quantity " 12-18 ". I am not a roatery guy for the most part, but do pull them out sometimes on flat days but usually not. Seems like many have given up on them, whats your thoughts on them?

  • #2
    Can't stand them. Look at some of the drone videos out there and you can't tell if the decoy is a flyer or a windsock/full body. Rotaries are a little different but still, IMO, not needed.

    Comment


    • #3
      When I used socks and hunted in white I used a jack kite on a fishing pole to get birds to give me another swing and on calm days I used a ss bouncer with a blue on it.
      Timing was everything with both and they definitely help get you an extra flock or two.

      As for flappers and rotteries i do not use them.
      I have and was never impressed with any of them personally.
      Like most have said over the years it’s the first thing you take down. No body ever takes themselves out of spread and leaves them up.

      But its it’s funny when you do take yourself out of the decoys a flock always lands in your decoys. Ironically or are they truly seeing you?
      So the question Iv always asked are you really sure birds are not seeing you laying in white ? Or the decoys for that matter.

      I dont use any of it at all and I don’t lay in the decoys either.
      Why atract attention to yourself

      Comment


      • #4
        In my experience they usually decoy the best when I tell Dad to watch for geese and I walk around in the middle of the spread. As soon as I look up to see him looking at his feet or staring into space I know I can look up and see locked up snows. Sometimes I don't even have to look above eye level.

        Comment


        • #5
          In my limited experience, I find them useful in an active feeding situation, say a corn field. I put out about 18-24 Silo-Sock flyers, on various length poles (4-6 ft. length). From a distance, they appear to be leap frogging over the others. I'll also place 6- Reel Wing 360s in the bunch. They add different motion to the bouncing Silo-Socks, and look like a feeding frenzy.
          No wind = no flyers.
          p.s. I make my own flyers, using the Silo-Sock flyer nose piece. The rest is made from old political signs and purchased Tyvek 1443R. They cost me about $7.50 to make.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Sarge View Post
            In my limited experience, I find them useful in an active feeding situation, say a corn field. I put out about 18-24 Silo-Sock flyers, on various length poles (4-6 ft. length). From a distance, they appear to be leap frogging over the others.
            From a distance at ground level. Go up a few hundred feet and look down at how the birds will see your spread .

            Comment


            • #7
              I think I've got about a doz flappers (silosocks) in my arsenal and use them off and on throughout the spring mostly on stalker and rotary units.

              I think they are another trick that sometimes works, sometimes not and tend to work better later in the year and can at times help center the birds right in front of the shooters. But like RR said, they are the 1st things a guy takes down if birds aren't committing.

              Over the years, I've learned more and more about spread design, hide and sound volume and would rank them higher has far as what determines success over flappers thats for sure.

              I have a drone this spring so will be getting some perspective as well from a birds eye view. I've climbed up the grain bin a few times to check sound volume and how the stalker/rotary units look and learned from that experience so the drone should be a good tool as well.

              Comment


              • #8
                I use the Sillosock fliers religiously every day we have over 5 mph of wind. I have about 45 total but typically use 15-25. I try first by putting them in 2 groups downwind, one group to either side and one of the groupsabout 25 feet from the shooters and the other about 100 feet. The birds come to the first set and slide to the others in the shooting lane and WHAMO!!!!! Perfect scenario....when that doesn't work I pull a bunch behind the shooters and try that. I hardly ever pull them unless the wind gets to be too much.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Watch enough small groups of 1,000 - 2,000 snows in a feed field and you will find there is very little flying and leap frogging. So unless you are putting out 10,000 plus decoys, what are you really mimicking?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I drove by about 8 feeds yesterday, one was 3 rows into a corn field from a 4 lane highway, the birds were running down the rows,Literally head down running, no way they were eating but they were trying to beat the other geese to a spot to eat. It was absolute chaos. My point is we can not in anyway make a spread look like that, But there are tools that can trigger the instinct of a waterfowl to think they are seeing something they are not. Rotaries flappers clones real wings on and on, I have never seen 2 or 4 snow geese flying around in a tight circle non stop for hours, or a duck hovering in one spot back flapping, but those things have both proven to be able to trigger a response.

                    One of the best reaction to the spread yesterday was with the truck and trailer sitting exactly in the middle of the spread. So maybe that is the secret.

                    Comment


                    • Cornstalks
                      Cornstalks commented
                      Editing a comment
                      That one almost didn't get away with doing that!

                  • #11
                    Originally posted by Geez n Quackers View Post
                    Watch enough small groups of 1,000 - 2,000 snows in a feed field and you will find there is very little flying and leap frogging. So unless you are putting out 10,000 plus decoys, what are you really mimicking?
                    I'd have to disagree with that. Depends more on the day than the flock size. Had a couple hundred sitting next to me last day of the season last year. They kept me there for hours longer than I planned because some kept getting up and looking like they were going to flop into my spread before banking and setting back in with the flock.

                    Comment


                    • CamoHunter870
                      CamoHunter870 commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I'd have to agree with you too TH, even small flocks of feeding snows of a couple thousand will be getting up/going back down again and leap frogging each other from what I've seen in my area when watching feeds.

                      I guess the only time I dont see it is if there is a ton of food in the field.

                  • #12
                    Flyers are overrated. I won't use them.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X